Encyclopedia of muscle & strength pdf

 

    pdf. ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MUSCLE & STRENGTH SECOND EDITION. Pages Title: Jim Stoppani's encyclopedia of muscle and strength. GVS74 Whether you seek fat loss and lean muscle development or mass development and strength improvement, more than exercises for 13 major muscle groups, . Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf) or read book online. Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength the definitions of strength and.

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    Encyclopedia Of Muscle & Strength Pdf

    More than 80 million people exercised using free weights and weight machines last year in the United States alone. That high level of interest and the complexity . See the Glog! Download Ebook Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength PDF: text, images, music, video | Glogster EDU - Interactive multimedia posters. Read here venloportledis.gq?book= Read [PDF] Download Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength.

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    Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength

    Published on Jul 26, Read here https: SlideShare Explore Search You. Submit Search. Successfully reported this slideshow. We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

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    Start on. Show related SlideShares at end. WordPress Shortcode. Published in: Full Name Comment goes here. Are you sure you want to Yes No. Sometimes a person may notice an increase in strength in a given muscle even though only its opposite has been subject to exercise, such as when a bodybuilder finds her left biceps stronger after completing a regimen focusing only on the right biceps.

    This phenomenon is called cross education. Muscles may atrophy as a result of malnutrition, physical inactivity, aging, or disease.

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    Inactivity and starvation in mammals lead to atrophy of skeletal muscle, a decrease in muscle mass that may be accompanied by a smaller number and size of the muscle cells as well as lower protein content. In humans, prolonged periods of immobilization, as in the cases of bed rest or astronauts flying in space, are known to result in muscle weakening and atrophy.

    The exact cause of sarcopenia is unknown, but it may be due to a combination of the gradual failure in the "satellite cells" that help to regenerate skeletal muscle fibers, and a decrease in sensitivity to or the availability of critical secreted growth factors that are necessary to maintain muscle mass and satellite cell survival. Sarcopenia is a normal aspect of aging, and is not actually a disease state yet can be linked to many injuries in the elderly population as well as decreasing quality of life.

    Examples include cancer and AIDS , which induce a body wasting syndrome called cachexia. Other syndromes or conditions that can induce skeletal muscle atrophy are congestive heart disease and some diseases of the liver. Disease Main article: Neuromuscular disease In muscular dystrophy , the affected tissues become disorganized and the concentration of dystrophin green is greatly reduced. In general, problems with nervous control can cause spasticity or paralysis , depending on the location and nature of the problem.

    A large proportion of neurological disorders , ranging from cerebrovascular accident stroke and Parkinson's disease to Creutzfeldt—Jakob disease , can lead to problems with movement or motor coordination.

    Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength: PhD Jim Stoppani: venloportledis.gq: Books

    Symptoms of muscle diseases may include weakness , spasticity , myoclonus and myalgia. Diagnostic procedures that may reveal muscular disorders include testing creatine kinase levels in the blood and electromyography measuring electrical activity in muscles. In some cases, muscle biopsy may be done to identify a myopathy , as well as genetic testing to identify DNA abnormalities associated with specific myopathies and dystrophies.

    A non-invasive elastography technique that measures muscle noise is undergoing experimentation to provide a way of monitoring neuromuscular disease. The sound produced by a muscle comes from the shortening of actomyosin filaments along the axis of the muscle. During contraction , the muscle shortens along its longitudinal axis and expands across the transverse axis , producing vibrations at the surface. In one line of thought scientists have believed that muscle cells evolved once and thus all animals with muscles cells have a single common ancestor.

    In the other line of thought, scientists believe muscles cells evolved more than once and any morphological or structural similarities are due to convergent evolution and genes that predate the evolution of muscle and even the mesoderm —the germ layer from which many scientists believe true muscle cells derive.

    Schmid and Seipel argue that the origin of muscle cells is a monophyletic trait that occurred concurrently with the development of the digestive and nervous systems of all animals and that this origin can be traced to a single metazoan ancestor in which muscle cells are present.

    They argue that molecular and morphological similarities between the muscles cells in cnidaria and ctenophora are similar enough to those of bilaterians that there would be one ancestor in metazoans from which muscle cells derive. In this case, Schmid and Seipel argue that the last common ancestor of bilateria, ctenophora, and cnidaria was a triploblast or an organism with three germ layers and that diploblasty , meaning an organism with two germ layers, evolved secondarily due to their observation of the lack of mesoderm or muscle found in most cnidarians and ctenophores.

    By comparing the morphology of cnidarians and ctenophores to bilaterians, Schmid and Seipel were able to conclude that there were myoblast -like structures in the tentacles and gut of some species of cnidarians and in the tentacles of ctenophores.

    Since this is a structure unique to muscle cells, these scientists determined based on the data collected by their peers that this is a marker for striated muscles similar to that observed in bilaterians.

    The authors also remark that the muscle cells found in cnidarians and ctenophores are often contests due to the origin of these muscle cells being the ectoderm rather than the mesoderm or mesendoderm.

    The origin of true muscles cells is argued by others to be the endoderm portion of the mesoderm and the endoderm. However, Schmid and Seipel counter this skepticism about whether or not the muscle cells found in ctenophores and cnidarians are true muscle cells by considering that cnidarians develop through a medusa stage and polyp stage. They observe that in the hydrozoan medusa stage there is a layer of cells that separate from the distal side of the ectoderm to form the striated muscle cells in a way that seems similar to that of the mesoderm and call this third separated layer of cells the ectocodon.

    They also argue that not all muscle cells are derived from the mesendoderm in bilaterians with key examples being that in both the eye muscles of vertebrates and the muscles of spiralians these cells derive from the ectodermal mesoderm rather than the endodermal mesoderm. Furthermore, Schmid and Seipel argue that since myogenesis does occur in cnidarians with the help of molecular regulatory elements found in the specification of muscles cells in bilaterians that there is evidence for a single origin for striated muscle.

    This author uses an example of the contractile elements present in the porifera or sponges that do truly lack this striated muscle containing this protein.

    Furthermore, Steinmetz et al. Steimetz et al. Thus, the usage of any of these structural or regulatory elements in determining whether or not the muscle cells of the cnidarians and ctenophores are similar enough to the muscle cells of the bilaterians to confirm a single lineage is questionable according to Steinmetz et al.

    Furthermore, Steinmetz et all showed that the localization of this duplicated set of genes that serve both the function of facilitating the formation of striated muscle genes and cell regulation and movement genes were already separated into striated myhc and non-muscle myhc. This separation of the duplicated set of genes is shown through the localization of the striated myhc to the contractile vacuole in sponges while the non-muscle myhc was more diffusely expressed during developmental cell shape and change.

    Steinmetz et al. Thus, Steinmetz et al. Furthermore, the Z-disc seemed to have evolved differently even within bilaterians and there is a great deal diversity of proteins developed even between this clade, showing a large degree of radiation for muscle cells.

    Through this divergence of the Z-disc , Steimetz et al. Through further molecular marker testing, Steinmetz et al. Through this analysis the authors conclude that due to the lack of elements that bilaterians muscles are dependent on for structure and usage, nonbilaterian muscles must be of a different origin with a different set regulatory and structural proteins. By understanding not only what genes are present in all bilaterians but also the time and place of deployment of these genes, Andrikou and Arnone discuss a deeper understanding of the evolution of myogenesis.

    Through their analysis, Andrikou and Arnone found that there were conserved orthologues of the gene regulatory network in both invertebrate bilaterians and in cnidarians.

    They argue that having this common, general regulatory circuit allowed for a high degree of divergence from a single well functioning network.

    Andrikou and Arnone found that the orthologues of genes found in vertebrates had been changed through different types of structural mutations in the invertebrate deuterostomes and protostomes, and they argue that these structural changes in the genes allowed for a large divergence of muscle function and muscle formation in these species.

    Andrikou and Arnone were able to recognize not only any difference due to mutation in the genes found in vertebrates and invertebrates but also the integration of species specific genes that could also cause divergence from the original gene regulatory network function.

    Thus, although a common muscle patterning system has been determined, they argue that this could be due to a more ancestral gene regulatory network being coopted several times across lineages with additional genes and mutations causing very divergent development of muscles. Thus it seems that myogenic patterning framework may be an ancestral trait.